Myrtle Beach View

Myrtle Beach Fish
Myrtle Beach View

Myrtle Beach Fish Identification Descriptions for Fish commonly found in Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach Events
Myrtle Beach Shopping
Myrtle Beach Bars - Nightclubs

We Have The Myrtle Beach View
Myrtle Beach Restaurant Reviews
Myrtle Beach Resort Reviews
Myrtle Beach News

 

 

 

Myrtle Beach Fish Identification Descriptions for Fish commonly found in Myrtle Beach

These are fish we find most commonly in Myrtle Beach. This will help you find a reference point to help you identify about 90% of the Fish you will find in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.


  • American eel
  • American shad
  • Atlantic bonito
  • Atlantic croaker
  • Atlantic cutlassfish
  • Atlantic spadefish
  • Atlantic sturgeon
  • Black drum
  • Black sea bass
  • Blackfin tuna
  • Blue marlin
  • Blueback herring
  • Bluefin tuna
  • Bluefish
  • Cobia
  • Clearnose skates
  • Crevalle jack
  • Dolphin
  • Florida pompano
  • Gag
  • Gray Snapper
  • Gray triggerfish
  • Great barracuda
  • Greater amberjack
  • Hogfish
  • Inshore lizardfish
  • King mackerel
  • Knobbed Porgy
  • Ladyfish
  • Little tunny
  • Northern puffer
  • Oyster toadfish
  • Pigfish
  • Pinfish
  • Red drum
  • Red porgy
  • Red Snapper

  • The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
  • Rock sea bass
  • Sailfish
  • Scamp
  • Scup
  • Sharks – Atlantic sharpnose
  • Sharks - Blacktip sharks
  • Sharks - Chessie
  • Sharks - Georgia
  • Sharks - Mary Lee
  • Sharks - Scalloped hammerhead
  • Sharks – Shortfin Mako
  • Sharks - Smooth dogfish
  • Sharks - Tiger shark
  • Sheepshead
  • Silk Snapper
  • Silver perch
  • Skipjack tuna
  • Southern flounder
  • Southern kingfish
  • Spanish mackerel
  • Speckled hind
  • Spot
  • Spotted seatrout
  • Stingrays
  • Striped bass
  • Swordfish
  • Tarpon
  • Tilefish
  • Tripletail
  • Vermilion snapper
  • Wahoo
  • Warsaw grouper
  • Weakfish
  • White grunt
  • White marlin
  • White perch
  • Yellowfin tuna
  • Common Types of Fish Caught in the Myrtle Beach, South Carolina area

    American eel
    American eel feed on fish, clams, and crabs in saltwater, and on fish, insects, worms, and other invertebrates in freshwater. These fish are caught incidentally while bottom fishing for other species using live or cut baits. Eating: These fish are not frequently eaten in the United States. However, the closely related European eel is considered a delicacy in Europe.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    American shad
    American shad are filter feeders, straining water through their gill rakers, and feeding on small crustaceans, algae, and insects. These fish are plankton feeders; however, they are often thought of as game fish. They are taken on hook and line with artificial lures known as shad darts. Eating: This fish has many small bones. The roe is considered a delicacy and is featured by many lowcountry restaurants.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Atlantic bonito
    Adult Atlantic bonito prey on small schooling fish and will also eat squid, mackerel, menhaden, anchovies, silversides, and shrimp. They can be cannibalistic. Adult Atlantic bonito prey on small schooling fish and will also eat squid, mackerel, menhaden, anchovies, silversides, and shrimp. They can be cannibalistic. These fish are mainly taken off South Carolina during the spring months by trolling artificial and live baits near the surface. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Atlantic croaker
    The Atlantic croaker make deep croaking noises made when the fish contracts specialized muscles against its swim bladder. The resonant sound is amplified and can be heard from quite a distance. This fish is a bottom dwelling, estuarine-dependent fish that becomes oceanic during spawning. They prefer mud, sand and shell bottoms, as well as areas around rocks, jetties, piers, and bridges. Adult croaker feed on detritus as well as larger invertebrates and fish. Sensory barbels allow the Atlantic croaker to find food on the bottom. Atlantic croaker are caught by bottom fishing with live and cut baits fished on or near the bottom. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Atlantic cutlassfish
    Atlantic cutlassfish are also known as Ribbonfish. Some of the species are known as scabbardfishes or hairtails; others are called frostfishes because they appear in late autumn and early winter, around the time of the first frosts. Fish of this family are long, slender, and generally steely blue or silver in colour, giving rise to their name. They have reduced or absent pelvic and caudal fins, giving them an eel-like appearance, and large fang-like teeth. Cutlassfish are not sought-after by anglers, although they can be incidentally caught on small fish, shrimp, or artificial lures. In fact, they steal bait meant for other fish and won't hesitate to use their sharp, barbed teeth on unwary anglers. They feed in a tail-down position, hovering under the surface and rising to strike. Their principal use is as bait for offshore species such as king mackerel, spanish mackerel and wahoo. Eating: Cutlassfish are not used as a food fish in the U. S., but are considered a delicacy in some other countries.

    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View

    Atlantic spadefish
    Atlantic spadefish can be found from May through November in oceanic waters nearshore. The spadefish is a bottom feeder, preferring shellfish, crustaceans, worms, mollusks, and jellyfish. These fish are known for their strong fighting ability. They are often caught using a small gold hook baited with pieces of clam, shrimp, or cannon ball jellyfish. Spadefish possess such strong schooling behavior that an entire school may follow a hooked fish. Eating: Excellent. These fish have firm white flesh that has a delicate flavor.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Atlantic sturgeon
    Atlantic sturgeon feed on a variety of bottom-dwelling organisms including insects, clams, mussels, crabs, and other crustaceans, as well as small fish and some plant material. The Atlantic sturgeon fishery is closedin state and federal waters. It is unlawful for anyone to catch, buy, sell, or ship Atlantic sturgeon caught in U.S. waters at any time. Atlantic sturgeon are rarely taken by hook and line. Historically, fisheries have been conducted with gill nets.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Black drum
    Black drum are inshore bottom fish. They are common in all inshore and shallow coastal waters year- round, but are most abundant February through July. Black drum feed on crustaceans and mollusks with a preference for blue crabs, shrimp, oysters, and squid. They locate food with their chin barbels and crush and grind shells with their teeth. Black drum frequently are caught by bottom fishing around natural, rocky outcroppings, artificial reefs, and other irregular bottoms with live and cut baits including crabs, clams, mussels, and shrimp. Eating: Good. Smaller fish (less than 20 pounds) are of good quality. Larger fish may be coarse, and they frequently contain parasites.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Black sea bass
    Spawning occurs in March through May. Black sea bass are hermaphroditic, beginning their lives as females and later developing into males. Still and drift fishing on or near the bottom with squid and live and cut baits are effective methods of catching these fish. They often voraciously attack a baited hook. Eating: Black sea bass have white, firm (but flaky) flesh that is a favorite of many fishermen.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Blackfin tuna
    Blackfin tuna are a pelagic, schooling fish found in warm waters. This species consumes small fish, crustaceans, and plankton, often feeds near the surface, and frequently forms large mixed schools with skipjacks. Blackfin tuna are known to be excellent light-tackle gamefish. They are taken primarily by trolling natural and artificial baits near the surface. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Blue marlin
    Blue marlin prefer deeper, offshore waters, usually near underwater structures such as canyons, drop-offs, and ridges. Blue marlin feed on squid and fish such as tuna and mackerel. They are solitary and hence do not form schools. Blue marlin are one of the most highly sought after game fish. They are known for their fighting ability, tail walking, and other acrobatics. These fish are caught both by trolling with natural and artificial baits and by live bait fishing. Eating: Good. Blue marlin are often smoked but generally released alive by anglers.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Blueback herring
    Blueback herring are filter feeders, straining water through their gills and feeding on small crustaceans, algae, and insects. These fish are not normally targeted by recreational fishermen and are infrequently taken on a baited hook. They are used as fishing bait and are also harvested commercially for crab bait. These fish are not generally eaten fresh, but rather, they are usually pickled and smoked.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Bluefin tuna
    The bluefin tuna's diet consists of squid, eels, and crustaceans, as well as schooling fish such as mackerel, flyingfish, herring, whiting, and mullet. They are schooling fish and congregate by size, swimming either single file (soldier formation) or in an arc (hunter formation). Bluefin tuna are taken still fishing and trolling with live and artificial baits. They are known for their strength, speed, and tremendous size. Bluefin are endothermic and able to maintain their body temperature up to 18 °F above the surrounding water, which makes them tremendously adapted to temperate and cold waters. They also retain 98 percent of muscular heat, may have the highest metabolism of any known fish, and are among the fastest and most wide-ranging animals on earth. When hunted or hunting, they can accelerate to 50 miles per hour. Eating: Excellent. Bluefin tuna are known for their flavorful flesh. They are the largest member of the mackerel family, having enormous commercial value, especially in large sizes. The largest price paid for a single Atlantic bluefin to date was US $90,000 at the Tokyo market, making this species the most economically valuable wild animal on the planet.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Bluefish
    Bluefish are typically found in shallow coastal waters traveling in schools. Bluefish are extremely voracious and even cannibalistic. They are known to target schools of menhaden, mackerel, and herring and will hold feeding frenzies, tearing through schools of small fish. These fish are known to bite anything. Fishing methods include trolling and casting live and dead baits from boats, piers, and the shore. Eating: Good. Bluefish quickly become soft and do not freeze or keep well.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Cobia
    Cobia feed mostly on crustaceans, particularly shrimp and crabs, as well as eels, squid, and various small fish found in shallow coastal waters. These are strong, hard-hitting game fish that frequently make numerous runs. They are caught trolling, bottom fishing, jigging and casting live baits and lures. Effective live baits include soft and hard crabs, eels, squid, and small fish. Eating: Cobia have white, solid flesh, considered by many to be one of the best tasting saltwater fish.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Clearnose skates
    Clearnose skates feed mainly at night on crabs and other crustaceans, and on bivalves such as clams, marine worms, squid, and fishes. This skate is taken incidentally while bottom fishing. Eating: Skates are typically not considered a food fish, but fins are occasionally eaten.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Crevalle jack
    This species is known as a ravenous predator, feeding on shrimp and other invertebrates, as well as smaller fish. They will often corner a school of fish or will chase prey onto beaches and against seawalls. These very fast-swimming fish are known for their strength and fighting ability. They are caught by casting and trolling with natural or artificial lures. Eating: These fish are not considered a good eating fish. Larger fish frequently contain parasitic worms.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Dolphin
    Not to be confused in name by the mammal Dolphin, Pompano dolphin forage on whatever is most abundant, dolphins feed in pairs, small packs and schools. Known for their hard-hitting and aerial gymnastics when hooked, dolphin are one of the most sought after of all marine fish both as a sport fish and as a delicious food fish. Dolphins are taken primarily by trolling natural and artificial surface baits but are also frequently taken by casting and by live bait fishing. Dolphins are considered by many to be one of the best tasting saltwater fish. Dolphins are often marketed as Mahimahi.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Florida pompano
    Florida pompano are abundant in and throughout shallow coastal inshore waters over sand and shell bottoms from June through October.The pompano feeds on mollusks, crustaceans, other invertebrates, and small fish. Florida pompano are caught on light tackle in the surf along beaches, in shallow waters, and around inlets. Eating: These fish have white, firm flesh that may be fried, broiled or grilled.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Gag
    Gag adults prefer such fish as sardines, porgies, snapper and grunts, as well as crabs, shrimp, and squid. Young gag feed mainly on crustaceans found in shallow waters. Gag spawn in February and March. A single female may lay more than one million eggs. These fish are frequently taken with live and cut baits fished around natural rocky outcroppings, artificial reefs, and other irregular bottoms. Eating: White, flaky flesh makes gag one of the most desirable fish for grilling, frying, or broiling.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Gray Snapper
    Gray Snapper feed mostly on crustaceans and small fish, primarily at night. Fish have an outer pair of canine teeth in upper jaw much larger than lower canines, tooth patch on roof of mouth anchor-shaped. They are taken by hook and line fishing on or near the bottom with live and cut baits. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Gray triggerfish
    This species is called the triggerfish because it has a locking mechanism in the first dorsal fin. A small second spine must be "triggered" to depress the long first spine. Triggerfish live at depths below 32 feet and can be found near both artificial and natural reefs. Gray triggerfish are omnivores that use a set of powerful jaws to crush their prey. The adults favor crabs, sand dollars, and mollusks, while the young consume plankton. Gray triggerfish are caught on live and cut baits fished on or near the bottom. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Great barracuda
    The great barracuda is carnivorous and is attracted to shiny objects or flashes as well as movement. They feed by sight rather than by smell. These fish are frequently caught by offshore anglers with plugs, spoons, or natural and artificial baits. The great barracuda is potentially dangerous to swimmers because of its tendency to strike at flashing objects and its characteristically large teeth. Eating: Good. These fish are generally not eaten because they are suspected of causing ciguatera poisoning in tropical areas.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Greater amberjack
    Greater amberjacks feed on fish, crabs, and squid. These fish are top quality game fish known as hard fighters. They are frequently caught trolling near the surface with artificial lures or bottom fishing with live bait. Eating: Larger fish may contain parasites (particularly in tail region). These fish are suspected of causing ciguatera poisoning. Ciguatera is a foodborne illness caused by eating certain reef fish whose flesh is contaminated with a toxin made by dinoflagellates, which adhere to coral, algae and seaweed, where they are eaten by herbivorous fish which in turn are eaten by larger carnivorous fish.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Hogfish
    Hogfish are most commonly associated with reefs and rocky outcroppings. The hogfish feeds on small fish, shellfish, and crustaceans. These fish are caught both in open water areas and on natural and artificial reefs, primarily on or near the bottom. They feed on mollusks, crabs, and sea urchins, but baits such as live and dead squid, shrimp, and fish are effective. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Inshore lizardfish
    Lizardfish are voracious carnivores that are capable of burying themselves in sediment where they lie in wait for small fish. The large teeth, adipose fin and long, cylindrical body separate lizardfish from other types of fish. Several species of lizardfish may be encountered in South Carolina offshore waters, but the inshore lizardfish is the only typical inshore resident.These fish are taken primarily by bottom fishing with live and cut baits in coastal and inshore waters. Eating: These fish are not generally eaten in the U.S.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    King mackerel
    Mackerel feed mainly on fish, as well as on a smaller quantity of shrimp and squid. King mackerel are taken primarily by trolling and drift fishing with natural baits and artificial lures. They are occasionally taken very close to shore from fishing piers. King mackerel are primarily an openwater, migratory species, preferring warm waters. They are often found around wrecks, buoys, reefs, ocean piers, inlets, and other areas where food is abundant, but they tend to avoid highly turbid waters. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Knobbed Porgy
    Knobbed porgies prefer to live near the sea floor at depths of 90 to 180 feet, over reefs, ledges, and wrecks. The knobbed porgy can consume a variety of prey because they are fast enough to catch small fish and have powerful teeth that can crush shells. They prefer bottom-dwelling creatures such as snails, crabs, sea urchins, starfish, clams, and barnacles. Knobbed porgy are often taken while fishing over natural and artificial reefs with natural baits such as squid, and live and cut fish. Eating: Good.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Ladyfish
    Adult ladyfish feed mainly on fish and crustaceans. Schools are often seen pursuing food near the surface. These fish are caught either by trolling or by casting with both natural and artificial baits. They are known for their fighting and jumping ability on light tackle. The Ladyfish is also known as the tenpounder. Eating: Ladyfish are very bony and not generally eaten.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Little tunny
    Little tunny are not as migratory as other tuna species and can be found regularly in inshore waters as well as offshore. Little tunny feed on squid, crustaceans, fish larvae, and large numbers of smaller fish, especially herring. Little tunny are caught by trolling and casting with both natural and artificial baits. They are often located by watching for birds feeding near the surface. Eating: Poor. The flesh of these fish is very dark and strongly flavored.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Northern puffer
    The northern puffer is also known as the "sea squab." The northern puffer can be found in bays, estuaries, and protected coastal waters. The diet of the northern puffer consists mainly of shellfish. Northern puffers are not considered a sport fish but are frequently taken on natural baits fished on the bottom. Eating: Excellent but risky. Northern puffer are reputably excellent but are not eaten frequently as the roe (eggs) and other organs are toxic. It is considered a delicacy in some countries.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Oyster toadfish
    These fish are caught incidentally while fishing for other bottom fish. They will bite any type of live or cut baits. Toadfish consume incidental vegetation as well as crabs, anemones, clams, shrimp, sea urchins, and small fish.They must be handled with care because of their strong jaws and the stiff spines in their fins. Eating: These fish are not normally eaten.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Pigfish
    Pigfish can be found in coastal waters over sand and mud bottoms. They are schooling fish and mostly nocturnal. Pigfish are bottom feeders that prefer to forage on crustaceans, worms, and small fish. These fish are mainly taken with light tackle using minnows, small jigs, grubs, and worms while fishing for other types of fish. Pigfish due to their size, 1/2 pound, 6-8 inches, they are frequently used as bait for other fish. Eating: Fair. Due to their small size, pigfish are usually released or used for bait.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Pinfish
    Pinfish are a coastal and inshore species that travel in schools, often over rocky bottoms and around docks and pilings. Pinfish feed on crustaceans, mollusks, worms, and occasionally small fish. Known as bait stealers, these fish are generally not targeted by fishermen but are taken regularly and used for bait due to their small size of 1/4 - 1/2 pound, 6-8 inches. Pinfish are named for the small spines on their fins that stick fingers and hands just like pins or needles. Eating: Fair. These fish are infrequently kept unless for bait because of their small size.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Red drum
    Red drum are abundant in all inshore and shallow coastal waters year-round, but are most abundant in May through October. This bottom fish uses its senses of sight and touch and its down-turned mouth to forage near the bottom. In shallow water, the red drum can often be seen browsing head-down with its tail slightly out of water (this is called "tailing"). In summer and fall, adults feed on crabs, shrimp, and small fish. During the spring, they feed on menhaden, mullet, pinfish, spot, Atlantic croaker, and flounder. Young red drum (3 to 15 pounds) are taken by drift or still fishing on the bottom and by fly-fishing on flats. Favorite baits include shrimp, mud minnows, jigs, plugs, spoons, and streamer flies. Older and larger red drum are taken from the beach just past the breakers with live and cut baits. Eating: Excellent. Fish less than 10 pounds are excellent. Larger fish may be coarse, of poor quality, and frequently contain parasites.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Red porgy
    Red porgy are found along the continental shelf. Red porgy are carnivorous bottom feeders that travel in schools, migrating to find food. They prefer crustaceans, mollusks, and small fish. These fish are often caught over natural and artificial reefs with natural baits such as squid, and live and cut fish and average 8-10 pounds, 10-15 inches. Eating: good.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Red Snapper
    Red snapper favor rocky bottoms at depths of 60 to 400 feet. Red snapper are opportunistic bottom feeders, red snapper prey on fish, shrimp, crabs, and worms. These are hard-hitting fish that are primarily caught on slow-moving or still baits such as squid or cut bait. Eating: Excellent. Red snapper are one of the most sought after fishes due to their food quality.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Rock sea bass
    Rock sea bass feed on small fish, shrimp, crabs, and other small crustaceans. Rock sea bass spawn in early spring from January through March. Eggs are deposited in the open waters or on the sea floor. Still and drift fishing on or near the bottom with squid and live and cut baits are effective methods of catching these fish. Eating: Good.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sailfish
    Sailfish are typically found in warm offshore waters. Sailfish feed on squid, octopus, mackerel, tuna, jacks, and herring. This is one of the most highly sought after of all game fish, known for its fighting ability, tail walking, and other acrobatics. These fish are caught both by trolling natural and artificial baits and by live bait fishing. Eating: Good. Atlantic sailfish are often smoked, but generally released alive by anglers.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Scamp
    Little is known about the feeding habits of scamp, except that they are ambush hunters and feed on small fish, squid, octopus, shrimp, and crabs. Scamp are caught by fishing over rocky and live bottoms and around wrecks and artificial reefs. Still and drift fishing on or near the bottom with squid and live and cut baits are effective. Eating: Scamp have white, flaky but firm flesh.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Scup
    Scup are a schooling species common in offshore waters in winter at depths ranging from 200 to 600 feet. Scup feed primarily on crabs, shrimp, worms, sand dollars, snails, and young squid although they will sometimes eat small fish. Scup usually browse and nibble over hard bottoms. Scup are caught still and drift fishing on or near the bottom with squid and live and cut baits. Eating: Good.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks – Atlantic sharpnose
    Atlantic sharpnose sharks are usually found in shallow water less than 30 feet deep. They can tolerate brackish water and will inhabit bays, harbors, sounds, river mouths, and estuaries. Atlantic sharpnose sharks form schools based on sex and size. Atlantic sharpnose sharks are frequently caught on or near the bottom using all types of live and cut baits including fish, squid, and shrimp. These fish are excellent fighters on light tackle. Eating: Good, the flesh may be soaked in milk or lemon juice to improve the flavor.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Blacktip sharks
    Blacktip sharks can be found both inshore and offshore and prefer clear water. Usually, they live near continental shelves, drop-offs, areas of surf, and near offshore structures. Occasionally, they can be found near river mouths, estuaries, and bays. Adult blacktips school in groups of the same sex. This is a very strong shark that is known for its leaping ability, often making several jumps when hooked. It is taken while trolling, still fishing, or casting with live and cut baits. Chumming is effective. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Chessie
    spend a great deal of time off the Myrtle Beach and South Carolina coast. She is a tagged shark being tracked by OCEARCH. The name Chessie comes from the Chechessee River in Port Royal Sound, South Carolina where the Port Royal Sound Maritime Center is located. The mission of the Maritime Center is to connect people with the waters and the lands of Port Royal Sound. Species:Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)Gender: Female, Stage of Life: Mature, Length: 12' 2", Weight: 1200 lbs, Tag Date: May 18, 2015, Tag Location: Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, link: www.ocearch.org/profile/chessie/
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Georgia
    Georgia may be seen off Myrtle Beach and South Carolina coast. She is a tagged shark being tracked by OCEARCH. Georgia was the first shark tagged during Expedition Jacksonville 2016. It is not often that you see white sharks and tiger sharks cohabitating. We were surprised to see Georgia show up behind the boat. The water temperature was perfect for white sharks at 65 F, which is also a temperature tiger sharks are found in. Species:Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier), Gender: Female, Stage of Life: Undetermined, Length: 8.5 ft, Weight: 253 lbs, Tag Date: Mar 18, 2016 Tag Location: Fernandina Beach, link: www.ocearch.org/profile/georgia/
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Mary Lee
    Mary Lee spends a great deal of time off the Myrtle Beach and South Carolina coast. She is a tagged shark being tracked by OCEARCH. Species:White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias)Gender: FemaleStage of Life: MatureLength: 16 ft. (4.9 meters)Weight: 3456 lbs.Tag Date: Sep 17, 2012 Tag Location: Cape Cod, Link:www.ocearch.org/profile/mary_lee/
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Scalloped hammerhead
    Hammerhead sharks are some of the hardest fighters of all sharks. They are taken by slow trolling and still fishing with any type of oily or cut fish. They are often taken while chumming. Hammerhead sharks feed on squid, fish, crustaceans, and turtles, as well as smaller sharks. Eating: Smaller hammerhead sharks (under five feet) are best as older sharks may have a very strong taste.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks – Shortfin Mako
    Shortfin mako are a carnivorous species, using their great speed during hunting. They will feed on squid, herring, billfish and small whales and porpoises. They favor swordfish, which they disable by removing their tails. This species is primarily taken while trolling for billfish, tuna, or other pelagic species. This shark will hit most natural baits such as whole mullet, herring, tuna, mackerel, and also cut bait while chumming. The shortfin mako is an extremely fast-swimming shark. It is known by sport fishermen worldwide for its leaping and aerial gymnastics. Eating: Shortfin mako are similar to swordfish in taste and texture.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Smooth dogfish
    Smooth dogfish are frequently caught in coastal waters during winter on live and cut baits fished on the bottom. The dogfish is a scavenger, but does regularly feed on crabs, lobster, and shrimp, as well as small fish. Eating: The flesh will spoil quickly if it is not kept on ice.


    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sharks - Tiger shark
    Tiger shark is a top-rated, hard fighting game fish that is frequently taken by anglers. They are often taken incidentally when they attack already hooked fish that are being reeled in. The tiger shark is infamous for being one of the most dangerous sharks. It has been known to attack humans. Eating: The flesh is frequently very strong, and it is generally not eaten.


    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Sheepshead
    Sheepshead frequent bays and estuaries and areas along the shoreline throughout the year. Sheepshead consume mollusks and crustaceans, often traveling in schools. They are browsing feeders that forage around pilings and may be located around jetties, over rocky bottoms, and in other places where they can find oysters and mussels. Sheepshead are caught almost exclusively by still fishing with fiddler crabs, mussels, and shrimp around structures such as rock jetties, pilings, and reefs. These fish do not attack the bait but nibble and gently mouth it, requiring the angler to anticipate when to set the hook. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Silk Snapper
    Silk snapper are found along rocky ledges, mostly at depths between 150 and 800 feet. The silk snapper is a carnivore that feeds on shrimp, crabs, gastropods, and cephalopods. Hook and line fishing on or near the bottom with live and cut baits is effective. Excellent. These fish have been suspected of causing ciguatera poisoning in the tropics.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Silver perch
    Silver perch are inshore fish and are most common in bays, tidal creeks, small rivers, and inlets near estuaries. Silver perch favor crustaceans, worms, and small fish. These fish are usually caught on or near the bottom while still fishing with live and cut natural baits such as fish, clams, shrimp, and worms. Eating: Good. Silver perch are often pan-fried.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Skipjack tuna
    Skipjack tuna are typically found in deep coastal and oceanic waters and can form schools composed of 50,000 or more fish. Skipjack feed near the surface and have a diet consisting of herring, squid, small mackerel, bonito, shrimp, and crustaceans. As these fish feed near the surface on small fish, they are often located by watching for feeding birds. These fish are caught by trolling and casting with both natural and artificial baits. Eating: Excellent. These fish are sold both fresh and canned.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Southern flounder
    Southern flounder prefer sandy and live bottom areas around pilings, jetties, oyster bars, and in high current areas. The flounder will bury itself in the sand and wait to ambush prey. They feed on shrimp, crabs, and fish such as anchovies, mullet, menhaden, Atlantic croaker, and pinfish. These fish are taken while drift fishing or casting with natural baits such as mud minnows, strips of cut bait, and pieces of blue crab, or with artificial baits such as buck tails, small spoons, and spinners. Eating: Excellent. Southern flounder have white, firm flesh.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Southern kingfish
    The southern kingfish is also known as whiting. Found year-round, but scarce during the winter months, kingfish are abundant in inlets and shallow coastal waters, and common along beaches. Like other members of the drum family, the kingfish uses a chin barbel to probe the bottom for worms, crabs, and shrimp. Southern kingfish are caught primarily surf fishing with live and cut baits including worms, shrimp, clams, fish. Eating: Excellent. Southern kingfish are often pan-fried.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Spanish mackerel
    Spanish mackerel are abundant in coastal waters from April through October. They prefer open water but are sometimes found over deep rocky areas and reefs as well as in shallowwater estuaries. They form large, fast-moving schools that migrate great distances along the shore, staying in waters with temperatures above 68 °F.Spanish mackerel feed on small fish, shrimp, and squid. These fish are taken primarily by trolling and drift fishing with natural baits and artificial lures. They are regularly taken very close to shore from fishing piers. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Speckled hind
    Speckled hind feed by opening their mouths and extending their gill covers to quickly draw in a current of water, forcing the prey to be inhaled and swallowed whole. This species favors fish, crabs, shrimp, and mollusks found along the bottom. Speckled hind frequently are taken by bottom fishing around natural rocky outcroppings, artificial reefs, and other irregular bottoms with live and cut baits. Eating: White, flaky flesh makes these fish most desirable for grilling, frying, or broiling.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Spot
    Spot can be found in estuaries and coastal saltwater, generally roaming over sandy and muddy bottoms. Spot feed on small crustaceans, detritus, worms, and small fish. Spot are taken from coastal fishing piers particularly during the fall months when larger adults migrate from northern areas. These fish are often caught near the bottom with shrimp, clams, and cut bait. Eating: Excellent. Spot are generally pan-fried.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Spotted seatrout
    Spotted seatrout are predatory, feeding primarily on shrimp and small fish, but also consuming mullet, menhaden, and silversides. Spotted seatrout are predatory, feeding primarily on shrimp and small fish, but also consuming mullet, menhaden, and silversides. Spotted seatrout are taken by trolling, jigging, surfcasting, and fly-fishing with both natural and artificial baits. Live shrimp is the best bait. Eating: Excellent.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Stingrays
    Stingrays feed by flapping their pectoral fins to stir up the sand, which helps them to find worms, small crustaceans, snails, and clams. Stingrays are taken primarily incidentally while bottom fishing with live and cut baits. Care should be taken when handling spines as they are dangerous. Poison from a gland along the grooves on each side of the spine is transferred to the wound when the spine stabs an object. Eating: Stingrays are generally not considered a food fish, but fins are occasionally eaten.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Striped bass
    Striped bass are voracious and opportunistic feeders that prey heavily on small fish. The striped bass is South Carolina's state fish. It is caught both in fresh and estuarine waters by a wide variety of methods, including trolling, jigging, bait fishing, surf casting and fly-fishing. Both natural and artificial baits are effective. Eating: The white, flaky flesh of striped bass freezes well and may be prepared numerous ways.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Swordfish
    Swordfish frequent oceanic and continental shelf waters from the surface to the deep submarine canyons, often exceeding 3,000 feet in depth. Adult swordfish are opportunistic feeders and are reported to utilize their bill to kill or stun their prey. They feed on squid, fish, and crustaceans. Swordfish are caught primarily at night by deep-drifting natural baits, such as squid. Many fisherman consider the landing of a swordfish as the highest achievement in fishing. Eating: Excellent. Considered by many to be one of the best tasting saltwater fish.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Tarpon
    Tarpon are known as a hard fighting game fish that often leap out of the water when hooked. The tarpon can survive in a variety of habitats and salinities and can even gulp air for extended periods when oxygen concentrations are low in the water. Eating: Tarpon are not generally eaten.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Tilefish
    Tilefish feed primarily on shrimp and crabs, but will also eat fish, squid, and bivalves. Tilefish spawn during the summer in deep offshore waters around 600 feet. Tilefish are a slow-growing and long-lived fish; however, little is known about their spawning habits or age of maturity. Tilefish are seldom fished recreationally because they reside at extreme depths. Eating: Excellent.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Tripletail
    The tripletail gets its name from its second dorsal and anal fins, which extend far back on the body so that the fish appears to have three tails. The tripletail inhabits coastal waters and commonly enters muddy estuaries in depths of up to 20 feet. Tripletail can swim or float on their side among floating objects. The tripletail feeds on herring, menhaden, anchovies, and eels, as well as shrimp, crabs, and squid. These fish are known for their strength. They are caught on both natural baits such as live and dead shrimp, as well as artificial lures. Eating: Excellent.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Vermilion snapper
    Vermilion snapper can be found in warm waters along irregular, reef-like bottoms. This species forages high in the water column on crustaceans, squid, and small fish. These fish are taken by hook and line fishing on or near the bottom with live and cut baits. Eating: Excellent.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Wahoo
    Wahoo gather around banks and pinnacles and can be occasionally found around wrecks and deeper reefs where smaller fish are abundant. Wahoo feed on porcupinefish, flyingfish, herring, scad, laternfish, small mackerel and tuna, as well as squid. Wahoo are known for their fastswimming, strong fighting, and jumping ability. They are generally taken while trolling, live bait fishing, and kite fishing for other offshore species. Eating: Excellent. Wahoo have white, firm flesh considered by many anglers to be one of the best tasting of all fish.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Warsaw grouper
    It is believed that these fish do not actively search for food but lie in wait ambushing their prey. They prefer to feed on fish, crustaceans, and even juvenile sea turtles. Warsaw grouper are caught bottom fishing over live bottoms and rocky outcroppings. A heavy rod baited with live or cut bait, such as squid, is effective. Eating: White, flaky and firm flesh.
    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Weakfish
    Weakfish prefer sandy bottoms. They are found in shallow waters along shores and in large bays and estuaries including salt marsh creeks and sometimes in river mouths. Weakfish are omnivorous, feeding on crabs, shrimp, and other crustaceans, as well as mollusks and small fish such as herring and menhaden. Weakfish forage at different depths and levels and are able to adapt to local food conditions. These fish are taken by casting, jigging, or still fishing with natural or artificial baits. Eating: Excellent. The flesh is soft and has a tendency to spoil quickly.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    White grunt
    White grunt can typically be found in 60 to 80 feet of water. They are schooling fish and are often located along the edges of reefs and at the base of structures. White grunt are bottom feeders that root in the sand and bottom matter near reefs. They feed on worms, shrimp, crabs, mollusks, and small fish. White grunt are taken frequently while bottom fishing with live and cut baits over natural and artificial reefs. Eating: Good. The firm, white flesh of these fish keeps well on ice.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    White marlin
    White marlin usually favor warm, deep, blue waters, but frequently come closer to shore. They are the most frequently encountered marlin along the Atlantic coast. White marlin are solitary, but do form small cooperative hunting groups where they herd baitfish. This species eats assorted fish and squid, generally consuming whatever is most abundant. These fish are taken by trolling artificial and natural baits and by live bait fishing. Eating: Good. White marlin is often smoked, but generally released alive by anglers.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    White perch
    During the spring, April through June, white perch migrate from estuarine waters into freshwater streams to spawn. White perch feed on a variety of small fish, insects, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. These fish are caught on or near the bottom, while fishing with most types of live or cut baits. Eating: White, flaky flesh that may be broiled or fried.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Yellowfin tuna
    Yellowfin tuna prefer deep, warm, temperate oceanic waters, but have been known to come fairly close to shore when there are warm currents. The yellowfin's diet depends largely on local abundance, and includes flyingfish, other small fish, squid, and crustaceans. These fish are caught primarily trolling with strip baits, artificial baits, and live baits such as small fish and squid. Chumming is effective. Eating: Excellent.



    The Top of Myrtle Beach ViewTop of Myrtle Beach View
    Popular Myrtle Beach Deals!